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Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958 

While Johns’ work is generally considered to be Neo-Dadaist, he is often identified as a Pop artist due to his use of classic iconic imagery, as seen above.  Johns often utilized the well-known images as they neutralized the need for a subject matter and he could present simple objects as entirely new.
Happy Independence Day!

Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958 

While Johns’ work is generally considered to be Neo-Dadaist, he is often identified as a Pop artist due to his use of classic iconic imagery, as seen above.  Johns often utilized the well-known images as they neutralized the need for a subject matter and he could present simple objects as entirely new.

Happy Independence Day!

museumuesum:

Jean Dubuffet
Apartment Houses, Paris, 1946Oil with sand and charcoal on canvas 44 7/8 x 57 3/8 in. (114 x 145.7 cm)
In 1923, after reading Hans Prinzhorn’s Bildnerei der Geisteskranken (1922), in which the art of the mentally ill was first considered to have aesthetic value, Dubuffet became interested in pictures made by those without formal training—the uninitiated, the alienated, and especially the insane. Many years later, in 1945, he started a collection of these pictures, which he called “Art Brut” (“Raw Art”), that eventually comprised 5,000 items. Not only did he regard Art Brut as a more authentic, genuine, imaginative, and spontaneous form of artistic expression, but he also came to reject the methods and values of traditional art. “Beautiful” and “ugly” had no meaning for him, and he tirelessly defended his “anti-art” and “anti-culture” theories in lectures and in two volumes of essays (1967). He wanted his subject matter to be accessible to simple people and to relate to their daily lives, and thus his first paintings were of Parisians riding the crowded metro.
This painting, part of yet another series of some fourteen oils and gouaches, focuses on pedestrians in various back alleys of Paris. Emulating the features of Art Brut, Dubuffet intentionally adopted a crude style. The street, sidewalks, and houses are stacked in rows, one above the other, without perspective, depth, or modeling. Windows and shop signs are stuck at random onto facades. The overall effect evokes the backdrop of a puppet theater, such as Dubuffet himself had built and decorated during his previous interlude as a painter (1934–37), when he also carved and painted marionettes.

museumuesum:

Jean Dubuffet

Apartment Houses, Paris, 1946
Oil with sand and charcoal on canvas 44 7/8 x 57 3/8 in. (114 x 145.7 cm)

In 1923, after reading Hans Prinzhorn’s Bildnerei der Geisteskranken (1922), in which the art of the mentally ill was first considered to have aesthetic value, Dubuffet became interested in pictures made by those without formal training—the uninitiated, the alienated, and especially the insane. Many years later, in 1945, he started a collection of these pictures, which he called “Art Brut” (“Raw Art”), that eventually comprised 5,000 items. Not only did he regard Art Brut as a more authentic, genuine, imaginative, and spontaneous form of artistic expression, but he also came to reject the methods and values of traditional art. “Beautiful” and “ugly” had no meaning for him, and he tirelessly defended his “anti-art” and “anti-culture” theories in lectures and in two volumes of essays (1967). He wanted his subject matter to be accessible to simple people and to relate to their daily lives, and thus his first paintings were of Parisians riding the crowded metro.

This painting, part of yet another series of some fourteen oils and gouaches, focuses on pedestrians in various back alleys of Paris. Emulating the features of Art Brut, Dubuffet intentionally adopted a crude style. The street, sidewalks, and houses are stacked in rows, one above the other, without perspective, depth, or modeling. Windows and shop signs are stuck at random onto facades. The overall effect evokes the backdrop of a puppet theater, such as Dubuffet himself had built and decorated during his previous interlude as a painter (1934–37), when he also carved and painted marionettes.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

fckyeaharthistory:

Happy Birthday to Salvador Dalí who turns 108 today. In honour of the legendary artist, here are some of his iconic surrealist artworks. 

Happy birthday to the master of surrealism himself!  Hope everyone’s having a very absurd day!

(Source: artpedia)

fckyeaharthistory:

Today marks the 84th birthday of Cy Twombly. In honour of the artist, here are some of his iconic artworks. 

(Source: artpedia)

an-artwork-a-day:

Willem De Kooning (American, born the Netherlands, 1904-1997, American Abstract Expressionism),Woman I, 1950-52. Oil on canvas, 6’ 3 7/8” x 58” (192.7 x 147.3 cm). MoMA New York.

De Kooning would have been 108 years old today!

an-artwork-a-day:

Willem De Kooning (American, born the Netherlands, 1904-1997, American Abstract Expressionism),Woman I, 1950-52. Oil on canvas, 6’ 3 7/8” x 58” (192.7 x 147.3 cm). MoMA New York.

De Kooning would have been 108 years old today!

analysis-of-modern-art:

Woman’s HeadJoan Miro1937 
The Spanish Civil War influenced Miro’s art in this painting in which a woman is reaching up to the sky with her mouth in almost a beak. She is seemingly rendered powerless and unnatural because of the war.

On his birthday, here is a visceral, jarring painting by Joan Miro.  Miro’s work was strongly influenced by both Dada and surrealism, with hints of abstract expressionism and color field painting, although he rejected membership to any and all movements.

analysis-of-modern-art:

Woman’s Head
Joan Miro
1937 

The Spanish Civil War influenced Miro’s art in this painting in which a woman is reaching up to the sky with her mouth in almost a beak. She is seemingly rendered powerless and unnatural because of the war.

On his birthday, here is a visceral, jarring painting by Joan Miro.  Miro’s work was strongly influenced by both Dada and surrealism, with hints of abstract expressionism and color field painting, although he rejected membership to any and all movements.

(Source: )

missfolly:

One Year the Milkweed, 1944, by Arshile Gorky

Happy Arshile Gorky’s birthday, maybe!  (The man was often very vague concerning details of his life, and was known to give different dates of birth in later years.  His year of birth still isn’t concretely known.)

missfolly:

One Year the Milkweed, 1944, by Arshile Gorky

Happy Arshile Gorky’s birthday, maybe!  (The man was often very vague concerning details of his life, and was known to give different dates of birth in later years.  His year of birth still isn’t concretely known.)

splitourheartsinhalf:

“Easter and the Totem” by Jackson Pollack

(1953, oil on canvas)
Happy Easter!

splitourheartsinhalf:

“Easter and the Totem” by Jackson Pollack

(1953, oil on canvas)

Happy Easter!

fckyeaharthistory:

Today marks the 159th birthday of Vincent van Gogh! In honour and tribute of one of the most recognizable artist of modern times. Here are some of his most iconic artworks. Happy birthday Vincent!!

(Source: artpedia, via artpedia)

brazenswing:

Frank Stella, Harran II, 1967

brazenswing:

Frank Stella, Harran II, 1967

(via brazenswing-deactivated20131127)